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In these unprecedented times, all businesses will be facing issues they have never encountered before. The disruption caused by the measures imposed to combat the COVID-19 outbreak are significant and wide-reaching, impacting every business and its suppliers, customers, workforce, investors and lenders. At Crowell & Moring, our lawyers across the globe have extensive experience of

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Crowell & Moring has released its Regulatory Forecast 2020: What Corporate Counsel Need to Know for the Coming Year, a report that explores the impact of regulatory changes on the technology industry and other sectors, and provides insight into the issues in-house counsel can expect to face in the coming year.

For 2020, the

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Crowell & Moring has released Litigation Forecast 2020: What Corporate Counsel Need to Know for the Coming Year. The eighth-annual Forecast provides forward-looking insights from leading Crowell & Moring lawyers to help legal departments anticipate and respond to challenges that might arise in the year ahead.

For 2020, the Forecast focuses on how the

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Forbes has created its inaugural “America’s Top Corporate Law Firms” list and worked with the market research firm Statistica to conduct an online survey of lawyers both at law firms and GCs between April 1 and May 17, 2019.

Self-recommendations were not considered and law firms that received the most recommendations were included

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By Anne Li, Mark Lichtenstein, Ilana Lubin, Preetha Chakrabarti, and Michelle Chipetine.

On Monday, May 20, 2019 the Supreme Court settled a decades-long circuit split  regarding a licensee’s ongoing trademark usage rights following the rejection of a trademark license agreement under the U.S. bankruptcy code. In an 8 to 1 decision, the Court found that “rejection breaches a contract but does not rescind it. And that means all the rights that would ordinarily survive a contract breach, including those conveyed here, remain in place.”


Continue Reading No “Backsies” – Licensors Cannot Use Bankruptcy To Claw Back Trademark Rights from Licensees says US Supreme Court

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A Georgia bankruptcy court on April 17 issued a significant ruling that breaks new ground concerning how future claimants’ representatives in asbestos bankruptcies (“FCRs”) are chosen.  In In re The Fairbanks Co., Case No. 18-41768-PWB (Bankr. N.D. Ga. April 17, 2019), the bankruptcy court held that (i) any party in interest may nominate an FCR candidate for the court’s consideration, (ii) the court must apply an “independent inquiry” into a proposed FCR’s qualifications, without giving deference to the debtor’s nomination, and (iii) “the proper standard for consideration of a future claims representative is akin to that of a guardian ad litem such that the individual must not only be disinterested and qualified, but also objective, independent, and loyally committed to protecting the interests of future claimants.”
Continue Reading Georgia Court Adopts New Procedures and Standards for Appointing Future Claimants’ Representatives in Asbestos Bankruptcies